Last edited by JoJozragore
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of Arab dhow trade in the Indian Ocean found in the catalog.

Arab dhow trade in the Indian Ocean

Hikoichi Yajima

Arab dhow trade in the Indian Ocean

preliminary report

by Hikoichi Yajima

  • 166 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Institute for the Study of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, Tokyo Gaikokugo Daigaku in Tokyo, Japan .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dhows -- History.,
  • Shipping -- Indian Ocean -- History.,
  • Trade routes -- Indian Ocean -- History.,
  • Indian Ocean -- Navigation -- History.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementHikoichi Yajima.
    SeriesStudia culturae Islamicae -- no. 3
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsVK99
    The Physical Object
    Pagination58 p., (12) p. of plates :
    Number of Pages58
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18852711M

    Book a real all inclusive resorts hotel in the Indian Ocean The island of Zanzibar is in the Indian Ocean, 50 km off the Eastern coast of Africa, a few degrees South of the Equator. It joined Tanzania in , known as Tanganyika at the time, and since then it has been a part of what is now known as the United Republic of Tanzania. Tamarind Dhow Cruise, As the dhow leaves the pier at around sunset, the setting could not be more delightful. The Tamarind Dhow Cruise, Mombasa. Discover Kenya's natural beauty wrapped in her rich as, the diverse cultures of her people and wide range of her wildlife that will make your safari built with fond memories.

    Sailing ships developed differently in Asia, which produced the junk and dhow—vessels that incorporated innovations absent in European ships of the time. It is common in the Mediterranean, the upper Nile River, and the northwestern parts of the Indian Ocean, where it is the standard rig for feluccas and dhows. Sambuk (ultimately from Middle Persian sambūk), known in New Persian as Sunbūk.   For centuries, the warm and shallow waters of the Dubai Creek supported the local pearl and fishing industries. An integral part of this ancient Arab world was the dhow. Dhows are traditional wooden boats that were masterfully designed and built by the local fishing communities and used for navigating the Red Sea and the Indian : Vishakha Gupta.

    IN , an Arab dhow carrying goods from Tang-dynasty China was discovered in the Indian Ocean off Belitung Island, Indonesia. Dating from the 9th century, the shipwreck is the earliest Arab vessel of this period to be found with a complete cargo, including intricately worked silver and gold vessels, bronze mirrors, jars once filled with valuable spices, and thousands of ceramic bowls and ewers.   The Indian Ocean Trade began with small trading settlements around A.D., and declined in the ’s when Portugal invaded and tried to run the trade for its own profit. As trade intensified between Africa and Asia, prosperous city-states flourished along the eastern coast of Africa.


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Arab dhow trade in the Indian Ocean by Hikoichi Yajima Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ancient dhow trade is recorded in a small book called The Periplus of the Erytraen Sea. Written in the first century by an unknown Greek author, the Periplus is a guide to the ports, people and trade goods of Arabia, India and the East African coast.

Arab dhow trade in the Indian Ocean. Tokyo, Japan: Institute for the Study of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, Tokyo Gaikokugo Daigaku, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Hikoichi Yajima.

http:\/\/ This map identifies dhow ports in the Indian Ocean. Indian Ocean trade was strongly influenced by a regional weather phenomenon called could travel during the winter months south with the monsoon in the summer the winds reverse direction and ships could easily travel north. The dhow was the most typical ship of the Western Indian Ocean, and the one most commonly used by Arab traders during the medieval era.

There are various. Thus, three styles of ships developed in the ancient world. On the Mediterranean, triremes and trade boats shared similar styles, with small square sails, and outboard steering oars.

On the Indian Ocean, dhows, with their triangular sails and stitched hull design dominated the waters. When the Monsoon winds carried trade across the Indian Ocean, the vessel of choice was the Dhow, with its characteristic lateen sail made with traditional Merikani cloth.

A Dhow is a one or two-masted Arab sailing vessel, usually with lateen rigging (slanting, triangular sails), common still today in the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean. For centuries, dhows have traversed the Indian Ocean, their sails harnessing the monsoon winds to transport goods, people, and ideas.

Today, dhows from India's Kachchh region continue their trade, operating in the gaps between global shipping lines with the expertise of sailors and guidance of Post. For centuries the dhow, the traditional Arab sailing vessel common along the shores of the Indian Ocean, operated according to the principles of free trade, carrying sailors, traders, passengers, and.

Yajima, Hikoichi, The Arab Dhow Trade in the Indian Ocean, Preliminary Report, Institute of for the Study of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, Tokyo.

The Arabian dhow, with its characteristic features, is one of the most evocative images of the Arabian Gulf, the Red Sea, and the Indian Ocean. The great cargo dhows represented a flourishing trade which stretched from the Mediterranean to China, in the time of the Portuguese and the Dutch from the 16th to the 18th by: Arab Dhow Courtesy of John Owens 3.

Courtesy of Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris. Fa-hsien image on book cover, Fa-hsien: A Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms 2. Original Map by James Legge, Fa-hsien: A Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms,Courtesy of The University of and I can see the immediate benefit of using the website for the topics.

Third is the economics of dhow trade. In the Arabian Sea, dhow trade is centuries old and has been popular among the smaller Gujarati and Kerala traders in India and in the Persian Gulf. Afro-Arab interaction in the Indian Ocean: social consequences of the dhow trade / A. Sheriff. Format Book Published Cape Town, South Africa: Centre for Advanced Studies of African Society, Description 30 p.: map ; 21 cm.

Uniform series Occasional paper (Centre for Advanced Studies of African Society) ; no. The wooden dhow, with its characteristic lateen sail, is an appropriate icon for the early trading world of the Indian Ocean. It was based on free trade unhindered by monopolies or superpower domination and pre-dated 'globalisation' by thousands of years.

It carried a motley crew of sailors, traders and passengers, and many commodities, but the dhow was not merely an inanimate transporter of. Navigation in the Indian Ocean has historically used the monsoons.

The Chinese knowledge of monsoons was documented first but the Indians and Middle Easterners benefited from them as well. The Greeks learned about sailing with monsoons between the Red Sea and northwest India no later than the expedition of Nearchus (– BCE).

David Livingstone’s first book, Missionary travels and researches in South Africa, published inwas a huge success, not only because of the harrowing adventures it related but because it alerted the British public to the existence of the Arab slave trade flourishing along Africa’s east coast.

The book, along with Livingstone’s many Author: Erin Rushing. Instrange new mariners made their first appearance in the Indian Ocean. Portuguese sailors under Vasco da Gama (~–) rounded the southern point of Africa and ventured into new seas.

The Portuguese were eager to join in the Indian Ocean trade since European demand for Asian luxury goods was extremely : Kallie Szczepanski. His books have shown the integral importance of the Indian and Arabian peninsulas to the East African trade.

This time he brings all areas into equal prominence. He has in this book given importance to the great movements of Indian Ocean history which interacted with the dhow trade, such as the Indonesian migrations and their effect on : Abdul Sheriff.

Slavery and the Slave Trades in the Indian Ocean and Arab Worlds: Global the dhow trade following the rise of steam ships and the opening of the Suez canal in — that few A Tentative Census,” in William Gervase Clarence‐Smith, The Economics of the Indian Ocean Slave Trade in the File Size: KB.

Traditionally used for trade on the Indian Ocean, the Arab dhow has been a long-standing presence on the East African coastal waters, and now you can enjoy an evening of sailing, dining and romantically dancing along the coastline aboard one of these historic sailing vessels.

Dhow is the generic name for a number of traditional sailing vessels with one or more masts with lateen sails used in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean region. Some historians claim the dhow was invented by Arabs or Indians.

Typically sporting long thin hulls, dhows were trading vessels primarily used to carry heavy items, like fruit, fresh water or.The Arabian Gulf and Oman have traditionally shared a common destiny within the Western Indian Ocean. The seasonal monsoonal winds were fundamental to the physical and human unities of the seafaring communities, producing a way of life in harmony with the natural world, a world which was abruptly changed with the discovery of by: Buy The Arab dhow trade in the Indian Ocean: Preliminary report (Studia culturae Islamicae) by Yajima, Hikoichi (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Hikoichi Yajima.